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How Long Does Web Development Take?


11th July 2018

Web design and development is a complicated process. That said, it needn’t take an age. Many businesses put off engaging with web development, however, because they become daunted by the time they fear web development might take.

Realistic expectations are important: understanding that web development takes time is part of properly planning for a project and setting meaningful benchmarks. There are two ways of being unrealistic, though: one can be too optimistic, of course; but one can also be much too pessimistic.

A good web developer will prioritise efficient working and timely delivery of a project. That said, a website can take a minimum of fourteen weeks from start to finish – not an insignificant period of time, however quickly a web designer works.

Starting with an understanding of the realities of web development, it’s entirely possible to limit any further delays – and ensure that fourteen weeks is all it takes. There’s no need to fear the dreaded “project creep”, or the endless web development programme … as long as some thought, and even some preparation, is put in place first.

Web development goes through five stages: discover, design, revisions, initial development and, finally, modifications. Being clear at each stage – ensuring briefs have real clarity and all parties are certain as to goals and KPIs – will ensure that no step needs to be repeated or take longer than necessary. Thinking about what you want before any work is undertaken will ensure that no labour is wasted.

Keeping each stage of the process clean in this way will make sure that the project isn’t slowed down by the web development equivalent of leaves on the line. Equally, you should ask three questions of each web design job: how soon can development begin, how long until the website will be ready for review, and when will you be able to launch the website?

The answers to each of these questions will be dictated by capacity: how busy is your designer, and how many resources are you – and they – able to devote to the project to ensure as rapid progress as possible?

Choose a developer who is able to respond to your needs, not one who is over-worked or bogged down; set project benchmarks so everyone is sure when interim stages should be reached; and devote yourself, too, to the timetable – often the launch date, in particular, will be all about when your own organisation is ready, as much as the site itself.

Ultimately, though, timescales will usually be most dependent on the complexity of the project. That brings us back to realism – be ambitious but don’t be a Pollyanna. A brochure site can be completed in weeks; an interactive e-commerce site is simply going to take a little longer.

Clarity can help grease the wheels; agreed timetables can keep all parties on track; but, ultimately, understanding the complexity of your project – and being honest about the implications of that for the length of time it will take to complete – is what truly decides how long your web development will take.

 

Contact Image Plus for Web Design & Development

If you need web design or development, then speak to our friendly experts. Our web developers are based in Coventry, Warwickshire and are always ready to help. Please feel free to contact us and speak to one of our website design specialists.

Contact us on 024 7683 4780 or send us an email at info@image-plus.co.uk.

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Tips for Using Images Effectively in Web Design


27th June 2018

Amongst the many tools open to a web designer to wow visitors to a given page, the humble image remains one of the most important. Though it has less technological sophistication than a cascading menu or a video background, a great photograph or drawing will capture the eye and the imagination in a way that is hard to match.

That’s perhaps why imagery has become so important again in web design of late. From a flat trend for icons and bold text at one point, we have cycled back to the use of great photography especially – the ‘hero image’ is now a mainstay of many a website, dominating a page and defining its look and feel.

Humans have a visual imagination, and the ‘hero’ image responds to that – and leverages it. Your first job on any web page is to keep your user’s attention. You want to reduce the bounce rate – the number of people leaving a page almost immediately because they find it some combination of boring, confusing or difficult to use – and imagery is a great way to connect immediately with your audience.

Maximising the effectiveness of your imagery, then, is a key means of maximising the effectiveness of your website. Grabbing attention, holding it and then directing it to the content your users want to see, or the content you want them to see, are all roles that can be served by imagery. So. How to make your site look its best?

 

  1. Use a high-quality hero image. The point of a hero image is that it dominates the screen. But when an image takes up most of the browser space, it needs to look incredible. As screens get sharper and more high-res, the impact of a stunning large-format hero image on a landing page is vital – but can only be achieved by matching the crispness of your users’ screens with the sharpness of your image.

 

  1. Consider cropping images. Care should be taken to draw the user’s attention to the main focus of the image, without leaving too much unnecessary empty space. Think about what the photograph is trying to convey – and where it is meant to be directing your user’s attention. Put that in the centre of things, even if you have to cut something else out to achieve it.

 

  1. Use images for UI elements and icons. Now this one’s a bit clever. Depending on the website you’re creating, images could be a really great way to illustrate particular sub-pages, or stories, or blog posts. Don’t full back on icons or clip-art – use crisp, exciting photography throughout your site. It’ll give every page an impact and identity … and your users will thank you for it.

 

Is your website ready for its close-up?

 

Contact Image Plus for Web Design & Development

If you need web design or development, then speak to our friendly experts. Our web developers are based in Coventry, Warwickshire and are always ready to help. Please feel free to contact us and speak to one of our website design specialists.

Contact us on 024 7683 4780 or send us an email at info@image-plus.co.uk.

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5 Website Navigation Trends of 2018


12th June 2018

It can be easy to ignore the importance of navigation design. The other aspects of websites are so much more obvious and exciting: colours and shapes, fonts and photography. But without good navigation design, your website might look great but be way too frustrating to use.

Navigation is, of course, the means by which a user gets from one page to another when using your site. The best websites will have intuitive navigation and menus that make immediate sense. Giving a clear structure to your site, and enabling your users to make their way through it, is the best means of helping your content do its thing.

There are all sorts of methods and techniques to make sense of navigation on behalf of your users – and, as with all elements of design, there are trends to take into account, too. We’re currently seeing five key approaches to menu design that can really help make a site comprehensible to first-time visitor or long-time user alike.

 

Sticky Navigation Bars

Sticky Navigation Bars, for example, keep the navigation menu in a fixed place on each page. This enables users to navigate the site from anywhere on the page – because the navbar follows them as they scroll through content. This is a great way of encouraging users to explore your site without risking them getting lost.

 

Mega Menus

Mega Menus are increasingly popular on websites, perhaps because they are rather different from more common, and therefore a little dreary, drop-down menus. Instead of just flowing downwards along a vertical line, mega menus expand wider, usually containing multiple columns of content. This is particularly useful if your site has a lot of inter-related content.

 

Responsive Sub Navigation Menus

Responsive Sub Navigation Menus are also crucial for sites with lots of pages. Designers will often hide some navigation links on mobile platforms, in order to help the menu fit better on small screens. This design trend retains the space-saving virtues of drop-down menus, but hides them by default behind a “hamburger” icon which, once clicked, expands across the content area.

 

All Capitalisation

All Capitalisation, meanwhile, is a rather more subtle trend but no less powerful. Here, the text of a menu item is displayed in ALL CAPS, offering a text style that feels clear, intuitive and symmetrical. We’re seeing this more and more, and, unlike other uses of all-caps online, it never feels like shouting.

 

Single Page Navigation

Finally, single page navigation is making a lot of the above redundant. Many sites – particularly those with less content to squeeze in – are now simply a single page with anchor points: click a menu item and the page automatically scrolls to the corresponding section. As well as sticky navbars, dot navigation – a series of circular icons located on the left or right side of the screen – is a big thing here, and helps further enhance the natural sleekness of single page sites.

 

So there you have it: navigation is changing, and you need to stay up-to-date if your users are going to stick with you. With luck, this quick review of the top five web navigations trends for 2018 has helped you find your way, too …

 

Contact Image Plus for Web Design & Development

If you need web design or development, then speak to our friendly experts. Our web developers are based in Coventry, Warwickshire and are always ready to help. Please feel free to contact us and speak to one of our website design specialists.

Contact us on 024 7683 4780 or send us an email at info@image-plus.co.uk.

 

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5 Ways to Improve Your Landing Page Conversions


30th May 2018

Improving your landing page conversion rate is perhaps the single most important thing you can do to enhance your business’s performance online. Imagine a physical shop that was so uninspiring that, upon entering it, shoppers almost immediately left – and certainly never purchased anything. That shop wouldn’t last long, right?

You should think of your website in the same way.

Your landing page is the first block of content visitors will see when arriving at your page. It might be your homepage, or it might be a specific area of your site set up to receive specific traffic from a particular ad or email offer; whatever its precise composition, its purpose is simple: to encourage your visitors to enter your sales funnel.

Amazingly, many landing pages simply don’t do this job as well as they might. Businesses focus on great search engine optimisation, but forget that, once all those new visitors arrive, the work isn’t over: your site still needs to put its best foot forward and convince customers to engage.

Try these tips to grab your users and not let go!

 

Keep a clean layout. A cluttered layout will simply drive users away from your site. To convince your visitors, and then direct them appropriately, you need to make your calls to action – and your steps to purchase – clear and easy to understand. Your text and images should come together logically to emphasize each other and make next steps plain.

Consider your Above-The-Fold content. “Above-the-fold” is a phrase from newspapers: broadsheet-style papers appear on shelves folded, and so it’s only the content in the top half of any front page that is visible on newsstand shelves – and therefore which contributes most to sales. Likewise, the first slices of content that appear on the opening screen of a website make-or-break: they need to engage users … and keep them engaged.

Consider your language. Your copy is important – it needs to be accessible and authoritative without being hectoring. People visiting your website want to know what your product or service can do for them. Consider teaching them about your product rather than selling it to them as this allows you to build trust. Inform and entertain – the hard-sell is a turn-off.

Use social integration. Make the most of your customers’ enthusiasm for their own networks. Integrating social media on your website allows your users to share your products or services with their friends and family – and that increases everyone’s interest in your business. Provide something useful – a download or a video – that people will want to share.

Use stats on your landing page. There may lies, damned lies, and statistics – but numbers matter. Meaningful statistics are powerful proof of your customer’s satisfaction with your product or service – and your users will respond accordingly. Using your numbers responsibly in this way can build further trust with customers from the off.

First impressions matter. So think hard about these five ways to improve your landing page conversions.

 

Contact Image Plus for Web Design & Development

If you need web design or development, then speak to our friendly experts. Our web developers are based in Coventry, Warwickshire and are always ready to help. Please feel free to contact us and speak to one of our website design specialists.

Contact us on 024 7683 4780 or send us an email at info@image-plus.co.uk.

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Tips for a Great Responsive Web Design


16th May 2018

One of the most important things you can do when building a new website is to commit to making it responsive. In 2018, people view websites on all sorts of screens and platforms – equipping your site with the ability to flex to any requirement on any device is crucial if it is going to be used – and enjoyed – by as many people as possible.

This is what we mean when we talk about responsive web design: deploying the tools and even tricks now available to web designers which can allow a website to query a given user’s device and software, understand the requirements thereof, and alter its own display properties to find a best-fit particular to that user.

For example, a mobile phone screen is far smaller than a desktop computer’s; your website cannot render identically on those two platforms, so how can it change its appearance to fit those two radically different environments? What should it look like on a tablet versus a laptop?

Does one of its features work great in Chrome but poorly in Firefox? These things matter if your bounce rate – the measure of how many users leave your site within seconds – isn’t to go sky high. Make your site as responsive to an individual customer’s needs as your other elements of customer service.

 

Navigation

For example, think about navigation. The adoption of responsive web design has had a huge impact on site navigation. Since you’re designing for smaller screens, your design needs to work within these limitations.

Long, collapsible menus might be fine on a big screen, but on a mobile, they’ll swallow up all your space; you might get away with devoting a lot of permanent screen space to a navbar on a 14” screen … but what about a 7” one? Consider the famous hamburger icon – hide the menu unless that is tapped or clicked. Give space to your content, not your waymarking.

 

Usability

On which note … really concentrate on the usability of buttons. Your call to action buttons should pop out from the page, both in colour and style. The size and shape of your buttons are just as important as their colour, especially for those with disabilities.

What do I mean by this? Simple: your buttons are where the action of your site is. The Pay button, the Contact button … these are the points of interaction that really matter, that convert eyeballs into customers. Don’t let the, float off a mobile screen; don’t allow them to be lost in a sea of stuff on a desktop. Consider them the stars around which your whole site orbits – the central points around which your responsive website shuffles the rest of its content. The technical term here is the visual priority, and your buttons should have it.

 

Imagery

Beyond this need to orient your site around your key buttons, content remains king – so use responsive imagery. One of the problems people run into with responsive design is that while images visually scale on smaller devices, they may still be large in file size and take a while to load. If your user is connected via a mobile data connection poorer than 4G, that can be a pain. Responsive images offer a powerful and effective workaround but can take a long time to hand code.

It’s a good thing you know a team of experts, then. Give us a call to discuss all these issues: there’s a lot more for us to discuss beyond these tips for a great responsive web design!

 

Contact Image Plus for Web Design & Development

If you need web design or development, then speak to our friendly experts. Our web developers are based in Coventry, Warwickshire and are always ready to help. Please feel free to contact us and speak to one of our website design specialists.

Contact us on 024 7683 4780 or send us an email at info@image-plus.co.uk.

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5 Upcoming Web Design Trends of 2018


16th April 2018

We’re already a quarter of the way into 2018, which is as good a time as any to pause, take stock and looking around us: what are the emerging web design trends of 2018? How has the year gone so far for designers, and what lessons and latest fashions can we take from the front-end of the year? In short, what should your site be doing to look like it’s keeping up with the crowd?

Web design trends should, like any fad or fashion, be used sparingly. It’s important to know what the latest developments are, but not necessarily essential that you use them all at once. Understanding the general lie of the web design land is crucial; being a slave to fashion will, in design as in life, only ensure you date yourself faster.

So take instruction and inspiration from the latest trends, but don’t make your site dependent upon them. Add accents to your current site by tapping into the newest design thinking, but at the same time don’t abandon the lodestars of usability and clarity that define good design whatever the year.

All those caveats given, however, what are the cool kids doing in 2018?

 

Web Animation

First and foremost, they seem to be into web animation. Flat design is being enlivened by subtle movement – and sometimes not-so-subtle! Animating transitions, or featuring animated characters throughout your design to add a little spark or interest, is the new normal.

We’re seeing more and more uses of web animation because they make ideas and interfaces easier to understand. Animation can direct and channel a user’s attention in helpful directions, enhancing their experience of a website, as well as also adding personality to it and its brand.

 

Bold Colours

Indeed, adding personality is a big element of recent design trends. Bold colours are increasingly a “thing”, which exciting and unusual hues standing out more and more from designs and replacing the once dominant whites and cool greys that defined a more minimalist approach to design.

There will continue to be more uses of adventurous colour in 2018 because getting out the paint pot can likewise help draw your users’ attention to specific areas of your site – and make the whole look and feel of your online home memorable and quirky.

 

Creative Typography

Adding that additional layer of character is probably the reason behind the explosion in creative typography, too. Don’t hide behind Helvetica – we’re seeing increasing experimentation in the realm of type, with all sorts of interesting and attractive fonts deployed to hold a user’s attention and add emphasis to key elements of a site’s copy.

 

Semi-Flat Designs

All of this is moving away from the revolution of a few years ago: we went from skeuomorphic design trend, which sought to make websites look and feel like their real-world equivalents, to a flat design fashion which emphasised the artificiality and sleekness of the online environment. Now, we’re in a “Semi-Flat Design” stage, in which sites are still sleek but gradients and shadows are being used to add nuance to a website.

Used in moderation, those gradients and shadows – like animation, colour and typography – can provide better aesthetics to a site. The final trend for 2018, however, is all about functionality: the increasing flexibility of mobile websites.

 

Priority on Mobile Browsing

Mobile phone browsing has now overtaken desktop browsing, which means that developers are focusing more and more on the mobile audience. That means more intuitive microinteractions and gestures will be incorporated into every design, to improve the browsing experience of mobile websites. Form and functionality: enhancing both is what defines the upcoming web design trends of 2018.

 

Contact Image Plus for Web Design & Development

If you need web design or development, then speak to our friendly experts. Our web developers are based in Coventry, Warwickshire and are always ready to help. Please feel free to contact us and speak to one of our website design specialists.

Contact us on 024 7683 4780 or send us an email at info@image-plus.co.uk.

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5 Tips for Improving Your Website Design


13th March 2018

Tips for improving your website design might at first glance seem too good to be true: like every other “weird trick” online – from how to lose weight to how to grow a better beard – web design tips can have the air of the con. Surely no complex issue can be boiled down to a few cute shortcuts?

Of course not. Web design is an art and a science, and you’d be best off engaging an expert (like us!) when considering building a website for your business. A few “weird tricks” won’t build you a proper website; it’ll barely help you understand how one works.

That said, there are some basic principles which underpin all good design that can help even a layperson perceive how their website might look better – and which, in the hands of a professional, can make a massive difference.

Websites are, of course, ten a penny these days – if they’re to stand out, they need to look good. That’s where some rules of thumb can come in really hand. Think of them as ways to avoid common errors which undermine websites that might otherwise have been rather more impressive.

1. Simplify your site.

Clutter is the enemy of good design. A page packed with unnecessary elements might feel like one which imparts a lot of information, but in fact, it will do the opposite – because no one will bother to read it. Be ruthless with what you include; make your web pages clean and lean.

 

2. Reduce colours.

Who doesn’t love a pop of colour, a splash of vibrancy? You can, though, have too much of a good thing. Try to use one or two colours with neutral hues which can complement each other. Loud Hawaiian shirts offend because they’re too busy – don’t let your site make the same mistake.

 

3. Stick with two fonts.

Typography adds character, but it can also be distracting. By limiting yourself to two typefaces, you’ll get the best out of your fonts: they’ll offer variation and visual interest without crowding each other out and making everything seem confused.

 

4. Don’t forget mobile.

This is a biggie, but it feels bizarre that in 2018 we still need to say it. Mobile browsing has been a thing for a while now, has never been more important than now – and yet you still see site after site which doesn’t work when you’re on the go. Stop it, designers! Make sure your site is responsive.

 

5. Have a plan.

Never, ever start a site without a clear sense of where you’re going with it. Know which pages are important, how your users will find them, and where everything is going to go.  Map your site so you know how it will be used. Only then should you start building … because usability is the goal of all good design.

These aren’t solutions to everything – there’s no such thing as a silver bullet in design. At the same time, there are simple mistakes you can avoid and basic principles you should always follow. And that’s why these are our top five tips to improve your web design.

 

Contact Image Plus for Web Design & Development

If you need web design or development, then speak to our friendly experts. Our web developers are based in Coventry, Warwickshire and are always ready to help. Please feel free to contact us and speak to one of our website design specialists.

Contact us on 024 7683 4780 or send us an email at info@image-plus.co.uk.

 

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How To Ensure Consistency in Web Design


6th March 2018

Ensuring consistency in web design is crucial. Indeed, any area of design can succeed or fail on the level of how well its various elements sit with each other – and how consistently. Design is ultimately a form of communication, and if we are to get anything across effectively there must be an element of constancy in our delivery.

In design, this most often means achieving a certain harmony – between colours and elements, shapes and sizes. Whatever identity your web designer intends to create for your company, the consistency with which they apply and repeat each element will go a long way towards ensuring that they achieve their aim.

 

Repeat Layout Styles

For example, repeating layout styles is a common way to give each page a fixed and predictable form. Consistent layouts are important if visitors to your website are going to easily find what they need: skipping between pages is one thing, but if each one is different it can be time-consuming to maintain your bearings. Pick a layout and stick with it: it will pay dividens.

Your aim should be to make your visitors feel comfortable, even at home; consistency in web design is about achieving just this, so that your website comes to feel intuitive in its familiarity.

 

Consistent Branding

So keep your branding consistent. Just as repeated layouts can help users settle into a rhythm on your website, so branding – a stable of colours, typefaces, logos and even images to which you return throughout the site in regulated ways – can help a user orient themselves. The subtle cues of branding work because they remind us where we are – this works on a website just as much as it does in a branch of McDonalds.

Ensuring consistency in web design is about building an experience that your user understands on a subconscious level: if a button was red on page one and did X, then a red button should also do C on page two. Branding helps direct users to expect certain effects, and helps them navigate spaces virtual and physical.

 

Intuitive Navigation

On which note … use intuitive website navigation. All these cues and clues will be for nothing if your menu makes no sense. Your users should understand a lot about your website just from your header and navigation links: make your signposting clear and simple, and arrange your content clearly and concisely.

Of course, relevant and good quality copy and content is key here: your users won’t thank you for helping them find what they need if when they get there it’s not much good. But taking that as read, if your users can find what they’re looking for easily, arrive at it simply, and feel immediately at home with what they find … then congratulations: you’ve learned how to ensure consistency in your web design!

 

Contact Image Plus for Web Design & Development

If you need web design or development, then speak to our friendly experts. Our web developers are based in Coventry, Warwickshire and are always ready to help. Please feel free to contact us and speak to one of our website design specialists.

Contact us on 024 7683 4780 or send us an email at info@image-plus.co.uk.

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Coventry: City of Culture 2021 … and Us


13th February 2018

As Coventry is named City of Culture 2021, here in the Image+ offices we’re wearing huge smiles (and possibly a couple of party hats).

We’re proud of our Coventry roots – we’ve been based here for nearly twenty years, and can’t think of anywhere we’d rather base ourselves. Our offices at Electric Wharf on the city’s regenerated canal network are everything that made Coventry a successful candidate for City of Culture 2021: vibrant, buzzing, forward-thinking but with links to an incredibly rich past.

Coventry, City of Culture 2021 (yes, we like the sound of that): it has it all. Medieval heritage in the cathedral quarter, mid-twentieth-century modernism in its remarkable architecture, passionate grassroots commitment to arts of all kinds … it’s a genuinely exciting city, and the rest of the UK is about to find out why in spades.

The win for our city is doubly sweet because we had a small part in it. A while back, we competed to become the designers of the bid team’s website and digital presence – and won. So we feel we contributed in a small way to what was, of course, a fantastic pitch. (And a winning one – did we mention that Coventry is City of Culture 2021?)

It’s the diversity of Coventry that I think helped tip the balance in its favour: it welcomes everyone and has room for everything. At Image+, we have on staff huge fans of Shakespeare and massive football nuts, petrol heads and live music goers. Coventry and its surrounding area cater to us all.

The website we built for the bid reflected this vibrancy: bright and colourful and with plenty going on, it also crafted a single identity for the bid and sought to bring together an awful lot of fizzing activity. It used events, social media, videos and bold colours and graphics to really bring home the bid’s particular character and personality. We’re pretty proud of what we contributed.

Coventry has its own particular energy, and the challenge for the bid was bottling that to present it to the panel of judges in distilled form. The website we built was a part of that process, of course, and we are made up that we helped in a small way to win this prize for our city. But the real winners are the people of Coventry themselves – and we’re pleased as punch to be a part of that crowd.

 

In short: here’s to Coventry, City of Culture 2021!

We’re not going to get tired of saying that.

 

Contact Image Plus for Web Design & Development

If you need web design or development, then speak to our friendly experts. Our web developers are based in Coventry, Warwickshire and are always ready to help. Please feel free to contact us and speak to one of our website design specialists.

Contact us on 024 7683 4780 or send us an email at info@image-plus.co.uk.

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How Can You Make Your Website Stand Out?


6th February 2018

Making your website stand out is ever more difficult. In today’s forest of web pages, how can your single tree ever hope to stand out from the crowd? What was once known as “surfing” the internet is more like “wading”; to mix metaphors, it can be hard to see the wood for all those trees.

The good news is that there are still plenty of ways to make sure that your website is a cut above the rest. A lot of this has to do with simple design principles. When applied well, good design simply makes a site look right – and it’s surprising how few sites, in truth, fully achieve this goal.

Layout & Structure

First and foremost, sort out your structure. Using a good layout is key to attracting and then retaining what we in the trade call “eyeballs”. If your navigation is clear and your site convenient to use, your visitors will like what they see – and make use of your pages again and again. In other words, you’ll stand out as a place to hang out.

Branding

Consistent branding can really help achieve this. A recognisable brand builds your reputation and inspires confidence. A good brand can provide visual clues, too, that can bind a site together like the egg in a cake mixture. Think carefully about colours, logos, and typography – make your site a uniform experience as much as a collection of pages.

Graphics

Indeed, using images and graphics appropriately can be a really powerful means of making an impact. If branding is the visual framework of a site, then photography and illustration acts as the decorative detail. Great imagery supplies visual flare and interest, making a site beautiful to look at as you use it – and every eyeball likes to be entertained!

Content

Finally, consider your content. The text and video you utilise to expand on and detail your messaging needs to reflect the identity of your brand. Your copy should be easy to read and characterful, but not distracting or overly wordy. Likewise, video is increasingly important on many sites, and offers a very dynamic way of supplementing your content.

Just remember to make sure that everything – video, photography, colours – are crisp and vibrant, the best quality you can produce. Muddy graphics or sub-standard video will reflect badly on you; however good the design of a site, if the content is wanting then you will only be able to stand out so far.

Ultimately, your goal is to stand out as much as possible – to be, at your best, head and shoulders above the other sites in your field. Clear design, consistent branding, and quality content are the best ways to achieve that. Get these basics right, and you’ll be amazed by the results.

Essentially, we’re telling you to get a good designer (fortunately, we know some!). It’s not rocket science: great design is how you can make your website stand out.

Contact Image Plus for Website Design & Development

If you need web design or development, then speak to our friendly experts. Our web developers are based in Coventry, Warwickshire and are always ready to help. Please feel free to contact us and speak to one of our website design specialists.

Contact us on 024 76834780 or send us an email at info@image-plus.co.uk.

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